DO YOU HAVE MOLD?

KEY SIGNS YOUR HOUSE MAY HAVE MOLD

Water Damage
Leaks in Plumbing
Humidity Levels
Condensation on Surfaces
Respiratory Issues
Rust
Material Warping
Furniture and Wall Deterioration
Strange Odor in the Air
Visible Mold

HOW WE LOOK FOR MOLD

LOCATE. VERIFY. TERMINATE.

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MOLD INSPECTION

Full comprehensive assesments with detailed reports and descriptions of defects found.

A mold inspection starts as a home inspection, which is a non-invasive, visual examination of the home's interior and exterior, and its various systems and components.  
The scope of a mold inspection requires particular knowledge of HVAC systems, roofs, the exterior, and plumbing systems. Musty odors, moisture intrusion via a roof or plumbing leak, or even evidence of suspected mold can warrant a mold inspection. 
. Leaks should be fixed as soon as possible. And indoor humidity and moisture should be controlled by making sure appliances, such as the clothes dryer and dishwasher, are vented properly, and that the vents themselves are operating as they should. Windows are another place prone to mold growth if the frames are old and damaged, or the seals on the panes have failed.

AIR SAMPLES

Testing Indoor Air Quality via Lab Based Results certified by laboratory analyses at AEML laboratories.

Mold spores are not visible to the naked eye, and the types of mold present can often be determined through laboratory analysis of the air samples.  Having samples analyzed can also help provide evidence of the scope and severity of a mold problem, as well as aid in assessing human exposure to mold spores.  After remediation, new samples are typically taken to help ensure that all mold has been successfully removed.
These samples are taken by using a pump that forces air through a collection device which catches mold spores.

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SURFACE SAMPLES

Up close and personal samples verified by certified laboratory analyses by AEML labarotaries.

It is helpful to think of air sampling as just one tool in the tool belt when inspecting a house for mold problems.  An air sample alone is not enough to confirm or refute the existence of a problem, and such testing needs to be accompanied by visual inspection and other methods of data collection, such as a surface sample.  Indoor airborne spore levels can vary according to several factors, and this can lead to skewed results if care is not taken to set up the sampling correctly.  Also, since only spores are collected with an air sample and may actually be damaged during collection, identification of the mold type can be more difficult than with a sample collected with tape or a cultured sample.

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